About the program

Created for any professional of the Built Environment, our curriculum incorporates traditional themes — cost, time, risk and quality management, strengthened with multidisciplinary topics — management, leadership, communications, and law. Lecture and experiential education provide students with the skills for practical application utilizing best practices that address current issues and developments in the industry.

Curriculum

Graduate studies in Construction Management programs are part-time, evening programs where students increase and intensify their understanding of critical management issues in the Built Environment.

The 30-unit Master of Construction Management degree program is intended for entry-level working professionals from all disciplines within the Built Environment along with students transitioning from undergraduate studies, and other industries.

Master of Architecture students in the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts are able to earn a Master of Construction Management degree simultaneously with their Master of Architecture degree through a unique joint degree program.

A 15-unit graduate certificate is also offered and can be earned independently to students pursuing other graduate degrees and stakeholders in the Built Environment including accountants, attorneys, real estate developers, banks/financiers, insurance/bonding professionals and others. 

* These courses are required to earn a Graduate Certificate in Construction

Pam Struttmann
Director of Student Recruiting
314-935-5484
sever@wustl.edu

Schedule a meeting with an adviser
Registration, Tuition Fees & Payment Policies

Qualified veterans: WashU McKelvey School of Engineering and the VA will cover 100 percent of your graduate tuition.

Although certificate programs do not qualify for federal loan programs, loans are still available for the master's degrees. For more information, contact Johanna Sengheiser (jsengheiser@wustl.edu).

Courses

Required Courses

T64 CNST 573 Fundamentals in Construction Management
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring

In this course, students will be exposed to the overall construction process from initial concept through startup of the completed facility. The focus is to provide familiarization of the construction and contracting process and potential involvements by construction managers in the planning, design, construction, and post construction phases. Additional topics are introduced to provide a foundation which will prepare students for future construction management coursework. Case studies and industry examples are used throughout the course to authenticate the lectures and assignments. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing


T64 CNST 523A Construction Cost Estimating
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring

Construction cost estimating explores the application of cost estimating principles and estimating within a project management framework in conjunction with scope definition, quality control, planning and scheduling, risk management and loss prevention techniques, local conditions, information and communication, and working relations with stakeholders. Using a single building project, the course introduces the application of basic quantity surveying and estimating principles using a methodical approach with suggested check lists and techniques for arriving at a reliable cost estimate including direct, indirect, and contingency costs and profits. Student's estimating efforts culminate with a competitive bid day scenario. Prerequisites: T64-573 or permission of instructor


T64 CNST 574C Construction Project Planning and Scheduling
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring

Project planning and scheduling process utilizing current techniques including critical path analysis for effective and logical scheduling of construction projects. Identification of project activities and their relationships; schedule development, analysis, and updating; relationship of project costs and resources to the schedule; legal implications; effective communication of schedule information; development of procedures to monitor actual field progress; computer application in project scheduling. Prerequisites: T64-573 or permission of instructor


T64 CNST 572 Legal Aspects of Construction
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring
 

A survey of the legal problems of the construction manager. including but not limited to, liability in the areas of contracts, agency, torts, insurance, bad judgment and oversight. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing


T54 PRJM 584 Communication Excellence for Influential Leadership
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring

Exceptional communicators become extraordinary leaders. This course will guide students to learn to exceptionally communicate their message by applying refined nuances that inspire and transform those with whom they converse. Through a proven communicative process, students will acquire skills necessary to differentiate them as leaders. Students will learn how to communicate across a variety of settings using strategies that result in clear, vivid, and engaging exchanges. Students will practice: storytelling; creating and using clear visuals; engaging listeners; demonstrating passion when speaking; responding to questions with clarity and brevity, and, using their distinctive voice as a leadership asset. Each student will learn how to assess his or her own communication capabilities, adjust to different listeners, and how to evaluate speaker effectiveness and provide valuable feedback to others. Video recordings will be used to demonstrate incremental communicative changes throughout the course, and to show how these strategies bring about outstanding leadership. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Technology Emphasis (Choose 4)

T64 CNST 580B Digital Construction Technology
3.0 Units
Fall

This course focuses on BIM's philosophy of integration between designers, construction professional, and owners, in order to overcome both technological and implementation changes using Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) and Integrated Project Delivery (IDP). VDC is a methodology that relies on a multidisciplinary collaboration of the digital simulation of design & construction. IPD, on the other hand, integrates people, systems, business structures and practices into a process to optimize efficiency and productivity. In this course, students will learn about BIM's application by exploring 3D, 4D aspects of BIM including geometry, spatial relationships, quantity take off, estimation and scheduling. Along with that, students also will learn about Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) and Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) system that are integral component of a successful BIM projects.


A46 ARCH 436B BIM in Practice
3.0 Units
Fall

BIM (Building Information Modeling) is a developing method of creating, sharing and managing project data through a visualized 3D or 4D model. While it continues to deliver on an initial promise to increase design consistency and efficiency while minimizing errors, the focus of attention is shifting to the use of BIM to facilitate integrated methods of project delivery. The course will explore the use of the BIM platform and the development of data exchange methods in architectural design through a case study and subsequent design project. Students will be provided instruction in Revit covering the creation, management, and extraction of data from a model, but will also look at the technology more broadly, discussing the changes advanced by the deployment of BIM processes in practice.


T81 INFO 506 Fundamentals of Information Technology
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring 

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive survey of the Information Technology field. The enterprise relies heavily on information technology to generate value, efficiency, and effectiveness. As such, organizational leaders must ensure that the enterprise transforms to keep pace in the competitive environment. Globalization, mergers and acquisitions, and proliferation of new business and operating models require management to continuously reconsider technology infrastructures, organizational structures, process re-engineering, outsourcing, innovation, technology effectiveness, and the creation and management of data and knowledge. Given these challenges and opportunities, the IT professional has never been more crucial to organizational success. In this context, students will become familiar with core IT concepts, processes, and technology and gain an increased understanding of the crucial role of IT in the modern enterprise.


T55 ETEM 510 Understanding Emerging & Disruptive Technologies
3.0 Units
Fall
 

We live in an era of rapid technology innovation and disruption. Blockbuster was the darling of Wall Street in 2004 and filed for bankruptcy in 2010. Blockbuster CEO in 2008: "Neither Redbox nor Netflix are even on the radar screen in terms of competition." Blockbuster is not alone in their blindness. Microsoft laughed off the first i-phone, and laughed off Google. IBM laughed off the first personal computer. These should be a horrible warning to all business leaders. Numerous technologies are threatening disruption today: block chain, Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), 3D Printing, 5G wireless networks, gene editing. Understanding what they are and how they might disrupt will make or break countless companies in the coming years. Prerequisite: graduate standing.


T81 INFO 574 Foundations of Analytics
3.0 Units
Fall

The steeply decreasing costs to gather, store, and process data has created a strong motivation for organizations to move toward "data driven" approaches to problem solving. As such, data analytics continues to grow rapidly in importance across industry, government, and non-profit organizations. This course seeks to equip students with a wide range of data analytics techniques that serve as the foundation for a broad range of applications including descriptive, inferential, predictive, and prescriptive analytics. Students will learn the process of building a data model as well as a variety of analytics techniques and under what situations they are best employed. Through lectures and practical exercises, students will become familiar with the computational mathematics that underpin analytics; the elements of statistical modeling and machine learning; model interpretation and assessment; and structured and unstructured data analysis. Students will also undertake a project to build an analytical model using a "real-world" data set.


T81 INFO 575 Enterprise Data Management
3.0 Units
Fall

Organizations have begun generating, collecting and accumulating more data at a faster pace than ever before. The advent of "Big Data" has proven to be both opportunity and challenge for contemporary organizations who are awash-even drowning-in data but starved for knowledge. Unfortunately, organizations have not developed comprehensive enterprise data strategy and management (EDM) practices that treat data as a strategic imperative. EDM is a comprehensive approach to defining, governing, securing, and maintaining the quality of all data involved in the business processes of an organization. EDM enables data-driven applications and decision-making by establishing policies and ownership of key data types and sources. The ultimate goal is to create a strategic context for the technology underpinnings of data life cycle management and ensure good stewardship of an organization's data. This course will cover the critical components of building an enterprise data strategy including, but not limited to, data strategy, data governance, data security, data architecture, data quality, data ownership, and metadata management.


T83 CYBER 559 Introduction to Cybersecurity 3.0 Units
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring/Summer

This course is intended as a comprehensive introduction to the cybersecurity field. It covers a broad range of cyber security terms, definitions, historical perspectives, concepts, processes, technologies, and trends with a focus on managing risk and the employment of cybersecurity as an organizational enabler.

Project Management Emphasis (Choose 4)

T64 CNST 550D Heavy Civil Construction Management
3.0 Units
Summer

This course provides a broad perspective of the means, methods, and procedures associated with managing civil engineering and heavy construction projects. Topics include strategic bidding and estimating, heavy equipment, marine construction heavy civil operations and bridge building. Integration of scheduling, estimating, and construction contracts with a project based approach. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing, and CNST 573 or permission of instructor. 3 units.


T54 PRJM 524 Hands-On with Traditional Project Management
3.0 Units
Spring
 

A practical orientation for learning traditional project management techniques that produce predictable results (on time, within budget, in accordance with stated specifications), and applying them to a project in trouble. Traditional project management is a universal and widely used practice which includes a set of developed techniques used for planning, estimating, and controlling activities. This course also introduces the standard project lifecycle: initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing. Prerequisite: graduate standing.


T54 PRJM 525 Project Management the Agile Way
3.0 Units
Fall

Agile, SCRUM, Kanban, ScrumBan, SAFe - these are some of the key concepts covered in this course. Agile as a mindset, a skillset, and a toolset are all critical in our fast-paced world. This course uses texts, case studies, and varying practical assignments. Students will come away with a solid understanding of the core agile concepts, frameworks and practices that are shown to deliver great business value and are taking the industry by storm. Prerequisite: graduate standing.


T54 PRJM 526 The Art & Science of Risk Management
3.0 Units
Fall
 

This course focuses on why many project managers miss requirements for schedule, budget or even both. The course concentrates on key Risk Management techniques practiced by leading Project and Program Managers and taught through fact filled lecture, case work and project execution as applied to information systems, engineering, financial, product/process and design projects/programs in today's fast moving environment. Students will take away key value propositions including Risk Identification, Risk Quantification, Risk Monitoring, Risk Control and Risk Mitigation. This course will enable the student to address common Scope, Schedule, Quality and Cost risk events that occur on complex projects. Project Risk Management examines the types of risk, with a focus on understanding the process of risk identification, assessment, prevention, mitigation, and recovery; governance, auditing, and control of the confidentiality; integrity; and availability of data. Using common operational, strategic, tactical, and technological scenarios, the coursework provides a comprehensive approach to the challenges faced by managers where global data is readily available, risk is pervasive, regulations are ever-increasing, and the threat of disruption from potential crises is real. Prerequisite: graduate standing.


A46 ARCH 447A Structures I
3.0 Units
Fall/Summer
 

Statics and Strength of Materials through Beam and Column Theory. Loads are defined and states of stress are identified and analyzed. The context of structural behavior is identified and optimal structural behavior and material efficiency structural design is reviewed. Form-active, bulk-active and vector active structural options are explored relative to the transference of load along the length of structural members. The course applies structural theory to the analysis and design of structural members - beams, trusses, arches and columns.


A46 ARCH 448A Structures II
3.0 Units
Spring/Summer

Continuation of Arch 447A with consideration of the effects of forces on structural members of various materials. Introduction to the design of structural members in steel, reinforced concrete and wood. Prerequisite: Arch 447A

Leadership Emphasis (Choose 4)

T54 PRJM 582 Developing Leadership for Professionals
3.0 Units
Spring/Summer

Provides knowledge about a variety of leadership approaches and how they may be effective in technological situations. The course concentrates on developing skills to actually lead in various situations. These include decision-making, problem solving, coaching, evaluating performance, selling ideas, and gaining commitment. Combines classroom, actual experiences, and reality-based feedback to hone skills resulting in a higher ability to lead.


T54 PRJM 583 Human Performance in the Organization
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring/Summer

Gain insights and practice in the art and science of leadership. This course addresses the leadership and management capabilities required to move into positions of greater responsibility, with a focus on technology-based organizations. Topics include leadership, goals, motivation and performance, management of change, conflict and effectiveness, organizational development and work design. Because when a leader gets better, everyone gets better. Prerequisite: graduate standing.


T54 PRJM 585 Group Dynamics in Project Team Performance
3.0 Units
Spring

This course examines how teams actually work looking at group behavior in social situations and how various leaders perform in these social situations. Group motivations of teams are also examined in light of the local situation and/or a large enterprise. Identifying the enabling conditions for team formation and the importance of context to team performance. The idea of a standard normal person and how it relates to team behavior. Subject areas covered include: Groupthink and the impact on projects; social facilitation with key stakeholders; project uncertainty and the dynamics of contribution; project and organizational climate.


B66 OB 524 Negotiation
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring/Summer
 

Managers spend the majority of their time negotiating - from negotiating schedules and vacation time to negotiating resource allocations to negotiating mergers and major policy decisions and their implementation. Skillful negotiation is a critical component of the tool box of the successful manager. The purpose of this course is to improve students' abilities to diagnose conflict situations, to analyze, plan, and conduct negotiations. The course material addresses negotiation as an effective means for implementing decisions and strategies and resolving conflict in a variety of settings. Course format will involve simulated negotiation and experiential exercises, cases, discussion, and lecture. Students will be evaluated on the basis of case analysis, negotiating performance, and a final project. Students may not take both this course and OB 561 for credit. This course covers topics in greater depth than the shorter OB 561 course, offers more opportunities for hands-on practice, learning, and feedback, and also covers a wider range of additional topics.


T54 PRJM 586 Cross Cultural Negotiation
3.0 Units
Fall/Summer
 

Cross-cultural Negotiation introduces and gives students practice with principle-based tools and techniques to reach agreements across varied cultures. Best practices from the most famous negotiators of ancient history ("the Phoenicians") are studied and used as a methodology, including the role of a third party in resolving conflict. The cross-cultural elements are based on the multicultural experiences, research studies and real-life experiences of the instructor. The course is highly interactive (about 70% of the course work). Participants learn through role plays and simulation, as well as readings and case study analysis.

Capstone Courses

Required for MCM Students

T64 CNST 579 Advanced Construction Management
3.0 Units
Fall/Spring/Summer

A comprehensive study of the operations encountered in the management of a construction firm. Topics include: estimating, scheduling, forms of contracts, risk analysis and management, extra work orders, claims and disputes, construction safety, and contract close-out. Prerequisites: T64-573, T64-574, T64-523A, and permission of Program Director.

Required for MCM/M.Arch – JDP Students

T64 CNST 581A MCM - M.Arch Capstone Project Phase 1
1.0 Units
Fall/Spring/Summer

This capstone course allows MCM/M.Arch joint degree program students to apply constructability principles to their M.Arch degree project (A46 616 ARCH), and successfully demonstrate how they have applied those principles. Constructability principles include: analysis of the construction methods and procedures, project cost, time, value, quality, and safety. Phase 1 is to be taken simultaneously with A46 616 ARCH Degree Project. Phase 1 students will develop a constructability review, analysis, and plan for their individual project. Prerequisites: Admission to MCM/M.Arch Joint Program, CNST 573, 523A, 574C 

T64 CNST 581B MCM - M.Arch Capstone Project Phase 2
2.0 Units
Fall/Spring/Summer

This capstone course allows MCM/M.Arch joint degree program students to apply constructability principles to their M.Arch degree project (A46 616 ARCH), and successfully demonstrate how they have applied those principles. Constructability principles include: analysis of the construction methods and procedures, project cost, time, value, quality, and safety. Phase 2 is to be taken after completing A46 616 ARCH Degree Project. Phase 2 students will execute the constructability plan developed in Phase 1 and prepare and present the deliverables. Prerequisites: CNST 581A
Independent Study

T64 CNST 500 Independent Study
Var. Units (max=3.0)
Fall/Spring/Summer

Independent study is a special project designed to allow students to further their education in advanced areas not available in the courses offered by the Graduate Studies in Construction Management Program or the Henry Edwin Sever Institute. It allows a student to develop in-depth knowledge that builds on the education provided in the core or elective courses offered in the Program. Only matriculated students with 3.0 GPA or higher may register for independent study. Students usually are not eligible to propose an independent study unless they have completed at least 15 units of T-64 coursework.

Students interested in independent study should first consult a faculty member to discuss the project and make sure he/she is willing to participate should an independent study be approved. Proposals must provide details of the project, reasons for why the project is necessary, the name of the instructor, and a plan of study. The student is responsible for selecting a topic, identifying a faculty member to sponsor the independent study project, and developing the proposal.

All registrations for T64-500 – Independent Study must have prior approval of a faculty sponsor and the Program Director.

Meet our faculty

Guy Augenstein Builder with expertise in project risk identification, bidding, and execution of public projects.

Guy Augenstein

  • Adjunct Instructor
Larry Delahanty Principal Project Control Engineer with 30+ years planning and executing domestic and international projects.

Larry Delahanty

  • Adjunct Instructor
Thomas Gregory

Thomas Gregory

  • Adjunct Instructor
Leah Lorendo

Leah Lorendo

  • Adjunct Instructor
Robin Shepard Leader in safety education, students won the Safety Award in the annual AIChE Design Competition for a record three consecutive years

Robin Shepard

  • Adjunct Instructor
Ken Slavens Partner and Lead for Husch Blackwell’s Real Estate, Development & Construction team

Ken Slavens

  • Adjunct Instructor

Graduate Tuition

Full-time student 
(9-21 units)

$28,150/semester ($56,300/year)

Enrolled in more than 21 units

$28,150 (plus $2,346 per unit over 21 units)

Full-time student, 
enrolled in 8 or fewer units

$2,346/unit

Part-time student, 
enrolled in 8 or fewer units 

$1,994/unit (applies to SI and TG Prime, not GR)

Graduate Student Activity Fee 
(full-time students)

$15/semester

Health & Wellness Fee 
(full-time students)

$524/year

 

Contact

Johanna Sengheiser
Graduate Financial Aid Analyst & Accountant
314-935-6183

Engineering Graduate Admissions
314-935-5830
engineeringgradadmissions@wustl.edu

 

Full-time status for Master’s Students is defined as: Enrolled in 9 units or more OR Enrolled in any “883” placeholder course (Masters Continuing Student) 

Full-time status for DSc Students is defined as: Enrolled in 9 units or more OR Enrolled in any “884” placeholder course (Doctoral Continuing Student)

Full-time status for PhD Students is defined as: Enrolled in 9 or more units OR Enrolled in any "LGS 9XXX" placeholder course. PhD students are required to maintain full-time status.

  • Tuition is based on the number of enrolled course units. When a student takes 9 or more units, a flat-rate tuition is applied. A per unit rate is applied if a student is enrolled in 8 or less units. 
  • Tuition for full-time students is determined by each student’s prime division, not by the division that teaches the course. Students should check with their department before enrolling in courses outside their division. 
  • International graduate students are not permitted to register for fewer than 9 units without special permission from the Office of International Students and Scholars.
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