About the program

Students learn the art and science of the full cycle of business, gaining hands-on experience by running simulated businesses and working on real industry projects. Courses taught by industry experts bring to life the key functions and capabilities that make a business run. Students learn to set strategy, leverage technology and data analytics, market to customers, interpret and drive finances, make informed data-based decisions, manage projects, build teams and lead. Leveraging best industry practices, experiential learning and WashU excellence, a WashU master's degree in Engineering Management is an unparalleled investment in your future success!

Request Information Upcoming Information Sessions
Resources for International StudentsExpert Courses

Curriculum

The 30-unit Masters in Engineering Management degree is available for full-time or part-time study.

The 15-unit graduate certificate in Engineering Management is also offered and can be transferred into the degree program at any time.

*These courses are required to earn a Graduate Certificate in Engineering Management.

**This program qualifies as a STEM program.

Pam Struttmann
Director of Student Recruiting
314-935-5484
sever@wustl.edu

Schedule a meeting with an adviser
Registration, Tuition Fees & Payment Policies

Qualified veterans: WashU McKelvey School of Engineering and the VA will cover 100 percent of your graduate tuition.

Although certificate programs do not qualify for federal loan programs, loans are still available for the master's degrees. For more information, contact Johanna Sengheiser (jsengheiser@wustl.edu).

Courses

Required Courses (7 courses)

Engineering Management & Financial Intelligence (T55-504)*
3 Units
Required

Discover the full picture of how business works within the organization. This course walks the student through the complete business cycle -- the roles the various functions play in a business operation as well as how information is used to make business decisions (e.g. financial data, marketing data, production data, economic data). To bring these learnings to life, this course also uses management simulation games and classroom competitions. Includes strategy, product planning and management, sales and support, research and development, manufacturing and supply chain, with particular emphasis on accounting, finance and the use of financial statements.


Decision-Making & Optimization (T55-505)*
3 Units
Required

Expand your ability to analyze and optimize complex business situations by leveraging the key data. Decision-making in today's complex world requires advanced analytical methods and tools, including mathematical modeling and quantitative techniques. Powerful tools for forecasting, finance, operations, production and logistics. Emerging technologies such as the Industrial Internet of Things (I-IoT) and Block Chain are enabling a whole new set of possibilities!


Technology Strategy &Marketing (T55-506)*
3 Units
Required

Learn the art and science of technology-rich strategy and marketing. Every business rises and falls on the value it brings to the customer and the value it simultaneously brings to the business itself. The engineer that understands and can communicate strategy and marketing is powerful! Business, technology and research budgets are allocated based on this value proposition, whether the commercialization or operationalization of the technology is 1 year out or 10 years out.


MEM Capstone (T55-585)
3 Units
Required

The MEM capstone course is the culmination of the Master of Engineering Management degree program. Taken at the end of the program, the capstone course gives each student (as part of a team) an opportunity to apply a cross-section of knowledge and skills gained towards a current challenge/project from industry, government or non-profit. Student teams are encouraged to interface with the sponsoring organization throughout the semester.


Understanding Emerging & Disruptive Technologies (T55-510)*
3 Units
Required

We live in an era of rapid technology innovation and disruption. Blockbuster was the darling of Wall Street in 2004 and filed for bankruptcy in 2010. Blockbuster CEO in 2008: "Neither Redbox nor Netflix are even on the radar screen in terms of competition." Blockbuster is not alone in their blindness. Microsoft laughed off the first i-phone, and laughed off Google. IBM laughed off the first personal computer. These should be a horrible warning to all business leaders. Numerous technologies are threatening disruption today: block chain, Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), 3D Printing, 5G wireless networks, gene editing. Understanding what they are and how they might disrupt will make or break countless companies in the coming years.


Project Planning Methodologies (T55-523)
3 Units
Required

This course exposes the student to the wide array of both fundamental and emerging tools and techniques to manage successful projects of various sizes and complexity - managing cost, schedule, quality, risk, solution and requirements - while adapting to today's fast-paced and uncertain business environment.


Human Performance in the Organization (T55-583)
3 Units
Required

Gain insights and practice with leading and managing people. This course addresses the management and leadership capabilities required to move into positions of greater responsibility, with a focus on technology-based organizations. Topics include leadership, culture, goals, motivation and performance, management of change, conflict and effectiveness, organizational development and work design. Because when a leader gets better, everyone gets better. (Note: Course delivery is compressed and largely online.)

Applied Analytics (Choose 3)

Applied Data Science for Practitioners (T81-577)
3 Units
Elective

Organizations are rapidly transforming the way they ingest, integrate, store, serve data, and perform analytics. In this course, students will learn the steps involved with designing and implementing data science projects. Topics addressed include: ingesting and parsing data from various sources, dealing with messy and missing data, transforming and engineering features, building and evaluating models, and visualizing results. Using Python based tools such as Numpy, Pandas, and Scikit-learn, students will complete a practical data science project that addresses the entire design and implementation process. Students will also become familiar with the best practices and current trends in data science including writing elegant code, documenting and version controlling, creating reproducible research in container platforms, and working in a cloud environment. Upon completion of the course, students will emerge equipped with data science knowledge and skills that can be applied from day one on the job.


Fundamentals of Information Technology (T81-506)
3 Units
Elective

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive survey of the Information Technology field. The enterprise relies heavily on information technology to generate value, efficiency, and effectiveness. As such, organizational leaders must ensure that the enterprise transforms to keep pace in the competitive environment. Globalization, mergers and acquisitions, and proliferation of new business and operating models require management to continuously reconsider technology infrastructures, organizational structures, process re-engineering, outsourcing, innovation, technology effectiveness, and the creation and management of data and knowledge. Given these challenges and opportunities, the IT professional has never been more crucial to organizational success. In this context, students will become familiar with core IT concepts, processes, and technology and gain an increased understanding of the crucial role of IT in the modern enterprise.


Foundations of Analytics (T81-574)
3 Units
Elective

The steeply decreasing costs to gather, store, and process data has created a strong motivation for organizations to move toward "data driven" approaches to problem solving. As such, data analytics continues to grow rapidly in importance across industry, government, and non-profit organizations. This course seeks to equip students with a wide range of data analytics techniques that serve as the foundation for a broad range of applications including descriptive, inferential, predictive, and prescriptive analytics. Students will learn the process of building a data model as well as a variety of analytics techniques and under what situations they are best employed. Through lectures and practical exercises, students will become familiar with the computational mathematics that underpin analytics; the elements of statistical modeling and machine learning; model interpretation and assessment; and structured and unstructured data analysis. Students will also undertake a project to build an analytical model using a "real-world" data set.


Enterprise Data Management (T81-575)
3 Units
Elective

Organizations have begun generating, collecting and accumulating more data at a faster pace than ever before. The advent of "Big Data" has proven to be both opportunity and challenge for contemporary organizations who are awash—even drowning—in data but starved for knowledge. Unfortunately, organizations have not developed comprehensive enterprise data strategy and management (EDM) practices that treat data as a strategic imperative. EDM is a comprehensive approach to defining, governing, securing, and maintaining the quality of all data involved in the business processes of an organization. EDM enables data-driven applications and decision-making by establishing policies and ownership of key data types and sources. The ultimate goal is to create a strategic context for the technology underpinnings of data life cycle management and ensure good stewardship of an organization's data. This course will cover the critical components of building an enterprise data strategy including, but not limited to, data strategy, data governance, data security, data architecture, data quality, data ownership, and metadata management.


Analytics Applications (T81-576)
3 Units
Elective

This course builds on the content taught in Enterprise Data Management and Foundations of Data Analytics. It focuses on the strategic, operational, tactical, and practical use of data analytics to inform decisions within an organization across a range of industry and government sector as well as within organizational functions. Students will be introduced to specific analytics techniques that are used currently by practitioners in areas of diagnostic, descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive analytics. Students will learn the critical phases of analytics including data preparation, model development, evaluation, validation, selection, and deployment. In so doing, students will learn to apply data analytics in order to optimize organizational processes, improve performance, and inform decision-making.

Computer Science & Security (Choose 3)

Introduction to Cybersecurity (T83-559)
3 Units
Elective

This course is intended as a comprehensive introduction to the cybersecurity field. It covers a broad range of cyber security terms, definitions, historical perspectives, concepts, processes, technologies, and trends with a focus on managing risk and the employment of cybersecurity as an organizational enabler.


The Hacker Mindset: Cyber Attack Fundamentals (T83-567)
3 Units
Elective

This course is designed to provide an introductory understanding of how offensive security techniques practically operate. During this course students will use hacking techniques to compromise systems, collect data, and perform other tasks that fall under the generally understood use of the term "hacker." These techniques will be related to risk-based defensive security practices with a view toward enhancing the student's understanding of what it takes to be a successful "defender." By the conclusion of the course, students will have a baseline technical understanding of hacking techniques, will have executed offensive security operations, and will have increased technical understanding of what it takes to deal with cyber threats.


Cybersecurity Technical Fundamentals (T83-560)
3 Units
Elective

This course presents a comprehensive survey of cybersecurity technology including basic theory and concepts. Students will gain hands-on familiarity of cybersecurity technology through lab exercises, in-class studios, and scenarios. Topics covered include security considerations surrounding operating systems, the web, email, databases, wireless, the cloud, and the Internet of Things. Also addressed are cryptography, secure software design, physical security, and human factors in cybersecurity.


Introduction to Computer Science (E81 CSE 501N)
3 Units
Elective

An introduction to software concepts and implementation, emphasizing problem solving through abstraction and decomposition. Introduces processes and algorithms, procedural abstraction, data abstraction, encapsulation, and object-oriented programming. Recursion, iteration, and simple data structures are covered. Concepts and skills are mastered through programming projects, many of which employ graphics to enhance conceptual understanding. Java, an object-oriented programming language, is the vehicle of exploration. Active-learning sessions are conducted in a studio setting in which students interact with each other and the professor to solve problems collaboratively. Prerequisites: Comfort with algebra and geometry at the high school level is assumed. Patience, good planning, and organization will promote success.


Data Structures and Algorithms (E81 CSE 502N)
3 Units
Elective

Study of fundamental algorithms, data structures, and their effective use in a variety of applications. Emphasizes importance of data structure choice and implementation for obtaining the most efficient algorithm for solving a given problem. A key component of this course is worst-case asymptotic analysis, which provides a quick and simple method for determining the scalability and effectiveness of an algorithm. Midterm evening exams at which attendance is required will be held on the evenings of Wednesdays, 9/23/20 and 10/28/20 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Prerequisite: CSE 131 and fluency with summations, derivatives, and proofs by induction.


CEL Entrepreneur Consulting Team (B63 MGT 550X)
3 Units
Elective

Early stage companies provide a unique environment for students to make a meaningful impact on the future trajectory of a growing organization. CELect is an experiential learning course that matches teams of Washington University students with St. Louis area start-up ventures to perform defined management consulting projects. In addition to the required day-long orientation and concluding sessions taught at the T-REx incubator downtown, students will work directly with the professor and with their client company on a consistent, but variable, schedule depending on the project needs over the course of the semester. In addition to being embedded on a project for an early stage company, students will have the opportunity to engage with other entrepreneurship support organizations such as local accelerators, venture capital firms, and incubators. Cross listed with Law as W74 675C: Interested law students should apply/register by adding their names to the waitlist in WebSTAC (W74 675C, and then sending their resumes to Prof. Tuch (c/o Andrea Donze, adonze@wustl.edu). They will be notified soon as to whether they got in or not. Once accepted, students may not drop this class. Enrollment Limited. Law Students: Prerequisite/corequisite: Corporations. As a law student enrolled in CELect, you may not give legal advice to anyone unless you are directly supervised by a licensed attorney who approves of the advice in advance. Additionally, you may not prepare any legal documents except under the direct supervision of a licensed attorney. Giving advice, preparing legal documents, or rendering any legal services would be the unauthorized practice of law unless such services are under the direction and with approval of a licensed attorney. Questions can be directed to Prof. Andrew Tuch at atuch@wustl.edu. This course is cross-listed with the Business School, B63-550X. Grading for Law Students is modified pass/fail: HP (3.94), P, LP (2.98), F (2.50).

Organizational Development & Management (Choose 3)
Cross-Cultural Negotiation (T54-586)
3 Units
Elective

Cross-cultural Negotiation introduces and gives students practice with principle-based tools and techniques to reach agreements across varied cultures. Best practices from the most famous negotiators of ancient history ("the Phoenicians") are studied and used as a methodology, including the role of a third party in resolving conflict. The cross-cultural elements are based on the multicultural experiences, research studies and real-life experiences of the instructor. The course is highly interactive (about 70% of the course work). Participants learn through role plays and simulation, as well as readings and case study analysis.


Developing Leadership for Professionals (T54-582)
3 Units
Elective

Provides knowledge about a variety of leadership approaches and how they may be effective in technological situations. The course concentrates on developing skills to actually lead in various situations. These include decision-making, problem solving, coaching, evaluating performance, selling ideas, and gaining commitment. Combines classroom, actual experiences, and reality-based feedback to hone skills resulting in a higher ability to lead.


Group Dynamics in Project Team Performance (T54-585)
3 Units
Elective

This course examines how teams actually work looking at group behavior in social situations and how various leaders perform in these social situations. Group motivations of teams are also examined in light of the local situation and/or a large enterprise. Identifying the enabling conditions for team formation and the importance of context to team performance. The idea of a standard normal person and how it relates to team behavior. Subject areas covered include: Groupthink and the impact on projects; social facilitation with key stakeholders; project uncertainty and the dynamics of contribution; project and organizational climate.


Communication Excellence for Influential Leadership (T54-584)
3 Units
Elective

Exceptional communicators become extraordinary leaders. This course will guide students to learn to exceptionally communicate their message by applying refined nuances that inspire and transform those with whom they converse. Through a proven communicative process, students will acquire skills necessary to differentiate them as leaders. Students will learn how to communicate across a variety of settings using strategies that result in clear, vivid, and engaging exchanges. Students will practice: storytelling; creating and using clear visuals; engaging listeners; demonstrating passion when speaking; responding to questions with clarity and brevity, and, using their distinctive voice as a leadership asset. Each student will learn how to assess his or her own communication capabilities, adjust to different listeners, and how to evaluate speaker effectiveness and provide valuable feedback to others. Video recordings will be used to demonstrate incremental communicative changes throughout the course, and to show how these strategies bring about outstanding leadership.

Project Management & Operational Excellence Emphasis (Choose 3)
Hands-On with Traditional Project Management (T55-524)
3 Units
Elective 

A practical orientation for learning traditional project management techniques that produce predictable results (on time, within budget, in accordance with stated specifications), and applying them to a project in trouble. Traditional project management is a universal and widely used practice which includes a set of developed techniques used for planning, estimating, and controlling activities. This course also introduces the standard project lifecycle: initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing.


Project Management the Agile Way (T55-525)
3 Units
Elective

Agile, SCRUM, Kanban, ScrumBan, SAFe – these are some of the key concepts covered in this course. Agile as a mindset, a skillset, and a toolset are all critical in our fast-paced world. This course uses texts, case studies, and varying practical assignments. Students will come away with a solid understanding of the core agile concepts, frameworks and practices that are shown to deliver great business value and are taking the industry by storm.


Art & Science of Risk Management (T55-526)
3 Units
Elective

This course focuses on why many project managers miss requirements for schedule, budget or even both. The course concentrates on key Risk Management techniques practiced by leading Project and Program Managers and taught through fact filled lecture, case work and project execution as applied to information systems, engineering, financial, product/process and design projects/programs in today's fast-moving environment. Students will take away key value propositions including Risk Identification, Risk Quantification, Risk Monitoring, Risk Control and Risk Mitigation. This course will enable the student to address common Scope, Schedule, Quality and Cost risk events that occur on complex projects. Project Risk Management examines the types of risk, with a focus on understanding the process of risk identification, assessment, prevention, mitigation, and recovery; governance, auditing, and control of the confidentiality; integrity; and availability of data. Using common operational, strategic, tactical, and technological scenarios, the coursework provides a comprehensive approach to the challenges faced by managers where global data is readily available, risk is pervasive, regulations are ever-increasing, and the threat of disruption from potential crises is real.


Strategies of Projects, Programs and Portfolios (T55-527)
3 Units
Elective

This course addresses the strategic alignment and prioritization of projects, programs and portfolios – both alignment with an organization's business objectives, as well as across multiple projects of a portfolio. This includes the alignment and management of project resources, project schedules, as well as management attention. Included is a team-based project simulation offering practical exposure to negotiating and assigning project resources – a key success factor in project management.


Facilitation Skills/Change Management (T71-502)
3 Units
Elective

The course integrates strategy and organizational due diligence with facilitation and change management strategies. By examining the relationship between employees, teams and organizations students will explore each level and practice assessing and facilitating team processes to maximize productivity and results for members and stakeholders. The course addresses how to get things done when teams lack leadership or authority. Supporting topics include how to build teams, how to manage meetings, how to build relationships beyond the team, and how to keep teams effective over their life span. Students will learn processes of change and the techniques of change to various types of organizations while using useful design frameworks for facilitation.


Lean Healthcare Concepts, Tools and Lean Management Systems (T71-503)
3 Units
Elective

Students will learn and apply core Lean tools including Value Stream Mapping, 5S, Visual Management, Standard Work, JIT, Push/Pull, Error Proofing, and Daily Management. Critical to applying Lean effectively, participants will also learn how to plan and lead Rapid Improvement Events and other group activities and tactics. This program has been adopted by BJC executive leadership and is identified as a core competency for transformational efforts. Students will also learn the essential elements of a Lean Management System and how to accomplish sustainable results and the development of a continuous improvement culture.


Six Sigma Concepts and Tools (T71-504)
3 Units
Elective

This course is designed to teach the tools associated with the 5 DMAIC phases (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control). Some of the tools considered for inclusion are: Critical to Quality Matrix (CTQ), Failure Modes Effectiveness Analysis (FMEA), Statistical Analysis, Contingency Tables, Hypothesis Testing, Confidence Intervals, Correlation & Regression, ANOVA (Analysis of Variation), Pareto Analysis, Statistical Process Control (SPC), Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA), Data Collection, Time Studies, Root Cause Analysis (RCA), Fishbone Diagramming, Cost of Poor Quality (COPQ), SIPOC, Detailed Process Mapping, Cause and Effect tools, Design of Experiment (DOE).


Legal Aspects of Construction (T64-572)
3 Units
Elective

A survey of the legal problems of the construction manager; including but not limited to, liability in the areas of contracts, agency, torts, insurance, bad judgment and oversight. Prerequisite: graduate status or permission of instructor.


Fundamentals of Construction Management (T64-573)
3 Units
Elective

In this course, students will be exposed to the overall construction process from initial concept through startup of the completed facility. The focus is to provide familiarization of the construction and contracting process and potential involvements by construction managers in the planning, design, construction, and post construction phases. Additional topics are introduced to provide a foundation which will prepare students for future construction management coursework. Case studies and industry examples are used throughout the course to authenticate the lectures and assignments.


Construction Cost Estimating (T64-523A)
3 Units
Elective

Construction cost estimating explores the application of cost estimating principles and estimating within a project management framework in conjunction with scope definition, quality control, planning and scheduling, risk management and loss prevention techniques, local conditions, information and communication, and working relations with stakeholders. Using a single building project, the course introduces the application of basic quantity surveying and estimating principles using a methodical approach with suggested check lists and techniques for arriving at a reliable cost estimate including direct, indirect, and contingency costs and profits. Student's estimating efforts culminate with a competitive bid day scenario.

Meet our faculty

John Bade Director of Strategy Development for Global Services & Support for Boeing Integrated Defense Systems

John Bade

  • Professor of Practice
Brandon Dempsey Author, Entrepreneur and Owner of goBRANDgo!

Brandon Dempsey

  • Adjunct Instructor
Liz Gehr Chief Learning Scientist and Associate Technical Fellow at The Boeing Company

Liz Gehr

  • Adjunct Instructor
Sherry Harsch-Porter Leader of executive coaching firm, author and Chapter chair for the Women Presidents' Organization (WPO)

Sherry Harsch-Porter

  • Adjunct Instructor
Jamie Inman

Jamie Inman

  • Adjunct Instructor
Ozzie Lomax Project Management (PMP) and Risk Management Professional (RMP) Certification 38 years Energy, Operations, IOT and Engineering SME CEO Lomax Consulting Group

Ozzie Lomax

  • Adjunct Instructor
Allen Miller Expertise includes supply chain management, data-analysis and human performance.

Allen Miller

  • Adjunct Instructor
Lethia Owens

Lethia Owens

  • Adjunct Instructor

Graduate Tuition

Full-time student 
(9-21 units)

$28,150/semester ($56,300/year)

Enrolled in more than 21 units

$28,150 (plus $2,346 per unit over 21 units)

Full-time student, 
enrolled in 8 or fewer units

$2,346/unit

Part-time student, 
enrolled in 8 or fewer units 

$1,994/unit (applies to SI and TG Prime, not GR)

Graduate Student Activity Fee 
(full-time students)

$15/semester

Health & Wellness Fee 
(full-time students)

$524/year

 

Contact

Johanna Sengheiser
Graduate Financial Aid Analyst & Accountant
314-935-6183

Engineering Graduate Admissions
314-935-5830
engineeringgradadmissions@wustl.edu

 

Full-time status for Master’s Students is defined as: Enrolled in 9 units or more OR Enrolled in any “883” placeholder course (Masters Continuing Student) 

Full-time status for DSc Students is defined as: Enrolled in 9 units or more OR Enrolled in any “884” placeholder course (Doctoral Continuing Student)

Full-time status for PhD Students is defined as: Enrolled in 9 or more units OR Enrolled in any "LGS 9XXX" placeholder course. PhD students are required to maintain full-time status.

  • Tuition is based on the number of enrolled course units. When a student takes 9 or more units, a flat-rate tuition is applied. A per unit rate is applied if a student is enrolled in 8 or less units. 
  • Tuition for full-time students is determined by each student’s prime division, not by the division that teaches the course. Students should check with their department before enrolling in courses outside their division. 
  • International graduate students are not permitted to register for fewer than 9 units without special permission from the Office of International Students and Scholars.

Free Lectures & Webinars 

Learn more